Tips for Making Lesson Outlines...

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Tips for Making Lesson Outlines...

Post  Jason Renshaw on Sat Mar 08 2008, 08:22

Hi there.

Some students have contacted me with concerns about what to do for their lesson outlines. I'll put another summary of the requirements here, and then show you how it is applied through the same example materials we used in class during week 1.

Overview of what to do for your lesson outlines:

1. Choose some material from an existing textbook or design your own material (for example a passage or a simple dialogue). If you use textbook material, you should scan the relevant page and send it to me. If you are making your own material, please attach it in a separate document.

2. Make a lesson outline for your material that has some sort of specific focus on learning spoken English skills.

3. Make sure your lesson outline includes the principles learned that week in class. As an example, the essential principles covered in week 1 were "Setting objectives for speaking classes" and "Develping speaking through noticing". So your first lesson outline should incorporate those principles.

4. Send your lesson outline to me by email (to jason.renshaw@gmail.com) no later than the Tuesday evening the following week. (So the first lesson outline will be due Tuesday March 11)

5. Do not use the materials from Boost! Speaking 1 as your input material. This book is used to show you the essential principles in the coursework. You should use another textbook or make your own targeted materials for the purposes of making your lesson outlines.


Okay, now look at the following example of lesson material from Unit 1 in Boost! Speaking 1, and the lesson outline that follows.




Example Lesson Outline


General Objective:
Help students improve their ability to introduce themselves to others in friendly and effective ways for first-time meetings in a school environment

Specific Objectives:

- Learn how to use and exchange basic greetings
- Learn how to use polite comments and compliments to make a good impression
- Learn how to show polite surprise through intonation


Lesson Sequence:


1. [Noticing] Ask students to look at the picture on page 9, but cover with their hand the dialogue text next to it. Ask for students to explain what they can see happening in the picture.

2. [Noticing] Close the textbook and ask students to come up with some ideas on ways to introduce themselves to new students or new classrooms. Have them practice this initially in pairs.


3. [Noticing] Without opening the textbook, play the dialogue between the two students shown on page 9. Students should just listen and try to get a general idea of what is being said and why.


4. [Noticing] Following the listening, ask the students as a group if they can recall:

a. any general information at all (for example, who is speaking, what information is being exchanged, why, etc.)
b. which words were used by the students in the dialogue to say hello
c. nice things the students said to each other (and why)
d. how Kin (the boy in the dialogue) showed his surprise about something


5. [Noticing] Now open the textbooks and have students practice it together in pairs. Then play the listening track again and allow students to read while they listen.


6. [Noticing] Ask the students the same questions from part 4 (above). By this stage it is hoped the students can:

a. talk about the characters, and the information they exchange (for example, where they are from and how long they have been studying English)
b. identify "hello" and "hi" as general casual greetings
c. locate the compliments used ("your English is really good!" and "your English is good, too") and explain that this is a good way to make friends with new people
d. understand and copy the repetition and rising intonation Kin uses to show surprise


7. Have the students get into pairs and try the dialogue together again.


8. Ask the students to design their own simple dialogues with a partner, using the same theme and skills as shown in the model dialogue between Kin and Maria. It should be personalized so that it is about the students themselves or new characters that they design for themselves. They should also change some key information like where they come from and how long they have been studying English.


9. Ask the students to memorize their dialogues and then perform them in pairs in front of the class. Rate each pair based on how well they have been able to use the speaking skills shown and practiced in this unit.



Okay, it's as simple as that. You get or make some speaking lesson material, and you make a simple lesson outline that explains what your general and specific objectives are, then the activities you are going to do in class, and which of them encourage the key principle of "noticing".

If you have any questions, please post them here in this thread and I'll do my best to answer them!

Best of luck!

- Jason

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Excellent example of Lesson Outline 1 (from Gloria Kim)

Post  Jason Renshaw on Wed Apr 02 2008, 04:56

Hi everyone,

Gloria's lesson outline (shown below) is a great example of what I was looking for from the first lesson outline assignment. Basically, she has designed a good situational dialogue, identified very appropriate general and specific speaking skill objectives, and demonstrated that she knows how to make basic in-class activities that will promote 'noticing' of the specific skills through the exposure to input materials.

Gloria was also one of the first to get her lesson outline done and sent in to me, so I am deeply impressed with both her effort and speaking teacher potential.

Well done, Gloria!

~ Jason

Lesson Outline 1



Unit 1 - Shopping at a store




Clerk: Hello, there. How are you, today? Is there anything that I can do for you?

Kate: Oh, hi. Yes, please. I’m looking for a present for my friend’s birthday. Do you have any ideas?

Clerk: How about ‘Massage relax & unwind Gift’? It is one of the best sellers in this store. It’s a bottle of Soya oil with the handcrafted wooden massager.

Kate: Sounds great! How much is this Soya oil with the handcrafted wooden massager?

Clerk: It’s only 20 dollars plus tax.

Kate: Good! That’s less than I expected. I’ll take it.

Clerk: Don’t you need anything else, except the ‘Massage relax & unwind Gift’?

Kate: I’m afraid not. Thanks, though. I’ll just take the Gift Set.

Clerk: All right. It is 22 dollars 40cents.

Kate: Here, I give you 25 dollars.

Clerk: Thank you. Here’s your change with receipt.

Kate: Thanks. Have a great day!
Clerk: Thank YOU! Have a wonderful day!



General Objective:

Help students improve their ability to buy some products they need at a store. Also, help students improve to check the price of the product at a store in effective ways



Specific Objectives:

- Learn how to use polite comments, using the magic word ‘please’
- Learn how to use and exchange the positive answer with intonation


- Learn how to deny the suggestion in polite ways.

- Learn how to ask and say the price of products

- Learn how to show ‘thanks’ feeling with intonation



Lesson Sequence:

1. [Noticing] Ask two students come up to the front, and let them read the dialog. . Students should just listen and try to get a general idea of what is being said and why.



2. [Noticing] After students listened to the dialog between the clerk and the customer, named Kate, ask them what they’ve heard from the dialog. They might recall:

a. any general information at all (for example, who is speaking, where they are at, the price of the product, how much money did come and go, what information is being exchanged, etc.)

b.which words were used by the clerk and customer in the dialog to say hello

c. things the clerk talked about the product

d. how the customer reacted, when she heard the price of the product

e. how the customer and the clerkshowed ‘thanks’ feeling each other.

f. how the customer denied the clerk’s suggestion



3. [Noticing] Now open the textbooks and have students practice it together in pairs. Then play the listening track again and allow students to read while they listen.



4. [Noticing] Ask the students the same questions from part 2 (above). By this stage it is hoped the students can:
a. talk about the information they exchange (for example, what the customer is looking for, what the clerk suggested for the present, and even the price of the products)
b. identify "hello" and "hi" as general casual greetings


c. talk about how to ask the price of products
d. locate the showing the positive answer with various ways (“
Sounds great!” “Good!”)
and explain that this is a good way to make people feel happy, being agreed with their opinion.
e. locate showing the way to deny the suggestion in polite way. (“I’m afraid not.”)


f. understand and copy the repetition and rising intonation the clerk uses to show ‘thanks’ feeling.



5. Have the students get into pairs and try the dialogue together again.



6. Ask the students to design their own simple dialogues with a partner, using the same theme (‘at a store’) and skills as shown in the model dialogue between the customer and the clerk. They should also change some key information like what the clerk suggest as a present and the price of the product. If the students want to make the customer want more products, they can keep talking with the same theme with the model dialog.



7. Ask the students to memorize their dialogues and then perform them in pairs in front of the class. Rate each pair based on how well they have been able to use the speaking skills shown and practiced in this unit.





***

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Another good example lesson outline 1 (From Namsook Jung)...

Post  Jason Renshaw on Wed Apr 02 2008, 05:07

Namsook's effort for lesson outline 1 (below) is another good example of what I was looking for in the first lesson outline - especially in terms of dialogue input, specific objective and activities to promote 'noticing' based on input.

Thanks Namsook!


Jung Namsook
Date: March 10, 2008
DIALOGUE

M : Good evening. Welcome to McDonald's.

What can I get you?

W : Could I get a chicken sandwich meat, super-sized?

M : What would you like to drink with that?

W : Coke is fine.

M : Your total is $6.94.

Would you like that here or to go?

W : To go, please.











Objectives:
Students will:
1. Be confident to order some food in the fast food restaurant.

2. Learn about the words and numbers.
3. Explore the way to use the words to buy what students want.


Resources / Materials:
-student journals presenting several kinds of fast food restaurant.

-Disposable cups and straws for a pop
-classroom board with flash cards


Activities / Procedures:

1. WARM-UP: Prior to class, prepare access to a variety of images from the restaurant www.mcdonalds.com
a. (noticing)- Ask students to describe the web site.
b. (noticing)-Showing some image cards of fast food makes students interested in the conversation in the restaurant.
c. (noticing)-Attracting attention displaying real disposable cups and straws in use.

2. Teachers play DVD that is recoded about the dialogue (above)
a. (noticing) When students are listening to the dialogue, teachers try to repeat three times each sentence underlined.

3. Divide students into groups of four (2 for employees, 2 for customers). Explain that they will be acting as groups as they imagine.

4. (noticing)-Throughout media, students understand the dialogue. Teachers show flash cards of the words of the dialogue.

5. (noticing) - Explaining the words, teachers are going to be an actor representing the meaning in body language.

6. Students understand the vocabulary as well as the situation and how to deal with in the fast food restaurant.

7. Each group adapts the dialogue and creates its own conversation.




Wrap-up/Homework: Individually, students should make new dialogue when it comes to the restaurant in the neighborhood.




***

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Great lesson outline 3 example from David Sohn

Post  Jason Renshaw on Wed Apr 02 2008, 10:12

David Sohn


LESSON OUTLINE for the 12th graders




General Objectives: Decision making



Specific Objectives:

1) Making suggestions

2) Persuading someone

3) Coming up with alternatives



Dialoguefour characters ( Nick, Jay, Jenny, and Kelly)

High School students in a classroom thinking of going to the movies>



Nick: Hey. What are you guys doing today? Do you have any plans?

Jenny: Well, not much. We were just thinking of going to the Heritage Park to play tennis.

Nick: You know what? I just got four free tickets. Do you want to go see Step-Up 2.

Jay: Whered you get them?

Nick: As you all already know, my dad works for a promoting company so he gave me the tickets because he doesnt any have time to go see a movie.

Kelly: Thats cool.

Jenny: To be honest with you guys, Ive already seen the preview and it seemed terrible. The first one was way much better. So Nick, is it okay if we see another movie?

Nick: There arent any movie titles printed on the tickets so I think thats possible. Do you have any other movies you want to see? Do you have any other options?

Jenny: Of course. Have any of you guys seen The Blueberry Nights, which came out last week, with Jude Law in it?

All three: No

Jay: I saw the preview, and it seemed pretty girly. Im sorry but I disagree on seeing that one.

Nick: Well, Kelly. Do you have any suggestions?

Kelly: I heard that Vantage Point is a masterpiece. How about that one?

Nick: Someone also told me that I shouldnt miss that movie. Lets go see that one! Ill check the time.

Jenny: All right. I dont want to miss that movie either.

Jay: Since Nick brought the free tickets, the popcorns on me, guys!

Two girls: Yeah! Then the drinks are on us!

Nick: Lets hustle, guys!

Lesson Plan




A. Noticing

Ask the students to form a group of four and answer the following questions.

1. How does Nick suggest his friends to go see a movie? In other words, how does he persuade them? [Persuadegive examples to students such as What do you to your mom when you want to buy a new computer game? Do you scream at her or beg her or persuade her?]

2. How did Kelly point out her idea of wanting to see the movie, Vantage Point?

3. How does Jenny disagree on seeing the new Step-Up movie? [Tell the students when and how they use the expression, To be honest.]

4. [Show the students an example of making suggestions or of persuading someone what they should get for dinner. In addition, if theres enough time, teaching kids how to order a meal or how to buy a ticket would be very effective in this lesson]



B. Drill

Do you have any plans? Does he/ Do we classes/ homework

We were just thinking of going to the Heritage Park to play tennis.

doing/ sleeping over homework/ at my house

My dad works for a promoting company he/ Michelle Samsung/ my uncle

Lets go see that one! go/ have snowboarding/ dinner



Directions for the drill (orders/ steps)

1. Apply the drill chorally (i.e. teacher à students)

2. Form a group of three to practice on their own on what they have already practiced at the above step with the teacher.

3. Ask the students to cover the left hand side (which are the original sentences from the dialogue), and then the teacher should read out for them and make them repeat.

4. Ask the students to cover the right hand side (which are the variables applying in the original sentences), and then the teacher should apply the new words in the original sentence, and make them repeat. [Since new words might be strange to most of the students let them take a look at them if they cant remember the new words.]

5. Ask the students to repeat the 3 and 4 steps on their own for another 7 to 9 minutes.



C. Enunciation

Sounds/ Words (Syllables)/ Sentence Stress



Sounds

plans tennis tickets see

another that either thinking

today going got other

Words (Syllables)

Free know miss

to-day ti-cket mo-vie

su-gges-tion mas-ter-piece

Sentence Stress

What are you guys doing today?

You know what?

Do you have any suggestions?

How about that one?




1. The students must listen and repeat the sounds and also the words in the table after the teacher all together.

2. The teacher should give false pronunciations and false stresses and in turn let the students point out the parts at which the teacher said falsely.

3. While going over 1 and 2, remind the students to say the stressed words out loud or jump when there is a stressed word.After doing this for 8 to 10 minutes, focus on the theta and eth sounds for the th sounds because the Korean students have huge problems with pronouncing and differentiating them.



Excellent work, David. I gave you a hard time over the first lesson outline, but this one is fantastic. Thanks for bouncing back so well and doing such a great job!

Take care,

~ Jason

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Awesome Lesson Outline 3 from Hyun-a

Post  Jason Renshaw on Wed Apr 02 2008, 10:37

This is close to an absolutely perfect lesson plan using all the examples and principles presented in this class so far. Thanks, Hyun-a!

Other students - look at Hyun-a's lesson plan below. There's a lot you could learn from it...


General Objective

Planning a party with their friend.



Specific Objectives:

1. Praising friend’s thing.

2. Disagreeing or declining other opinion.

3. Presenting opinion and suggestion.

4. Providing details about party.



Setting – Mina is holding her graduation party in Suji’s French restaurant. They are meeting to plan the menu.



Suji: Welcome to Vive Ie France, Mina !

Mina: Oh, Suji. Your restaurant is so cute. It’s perfect for my graduation party.

Suji: I’m glad you like it. Shall we plan the menu?

Mina: Sure! For starters, I think I’d like some pastries and blueberry crepes.

Suji: I’m afraid I can’t get any blueberries. They’re out of season.

Mina: Can you get strawberries? I love strawberries.

Suji: Yes, of course I can.

Mina: Fabulous! Can you make some croissants too?

Suji: Your wish is my command. How many people are you expecting?

Mina: I think there will be about fifty.

Suji: That’s a big party. I have a lot of planning to do.

Mina: Will you be able to do it?

Suji: Definitely. I have plenty of time.



A. Noticing

Ask the students get into groups(3~4 students)


[Pic provided of Korean party/get-together with people eating around a table]


1. Have the look at the pictures above and talk about them.

2. Ask the students “Have you ever had an experience like this?”

[Explain about party. Ask the students experience about party.

For example, “What did you do in your birthday?” then 1 student would say “I ate special food with my friend” I would say “This is a party!”]

3. Ask the students “What kind of party do you want?” and the student would say graduation party or birthday party something like that. If you plan party in each your group, what do you say partner politely?

[For example, “Shall we plan the menu?” or “Shall we plan the place?”]

4. How to present your opinion politely. Use real simple example. Ask the students try to find answers. Have the students use “ I think I’d like” . [For example, “If you want to say opinion in classroom discussion. What would you say?” One of the students would say “I think we have to study a lot.”]

How to decline other friend’s opinion politely. Have the students use “I’m afraid…”

[For example, “ If you think that your friend’s opinion is impossible, what would you say?” One of the students would say “I’m afraid I can’t play with you.”]

5. Point out 1 students and “If your friend’s pencil looks good, what do you say?”

The student would say “This is so good.”



B. Drill

Your restaurant is so cute. My, Their Great, Messy

Can you make some croissants too? Keep, Eat Lots of, a little



1. First apply the drill chorally ( teacher à student)

2. Ask the students get into groups (3~4 students). 1 student says first sentence. And then point out another student randomly. That student pointed out say second sentence. This pattern will go on like game.

3. 1 student wink and say first sentence. If that students wink of right eye, another student sitting in the right side say second sentence. This pattern will go on like game.

4. Point out 1 student in the each group. He or she draws the sentence’s description. For example, he draws some picture to describe “your restaurant is so cute.” Other students solve the question; compose the sentence.



C. Enunciation

party, perfect, present, praise

big, able, blueberry, strawberry

cute, make, love

sea-son, start-er, crois-sant,

res-tau-rant, fab-u-lous



I’m glad you like it

I have a lot of planning to do.

I think there will be about fifty.


1. Listen and repeat the sounds and the words after the teacher chorally.

2. Have the students nod their head the number of syllables for each word.

3. For the 2 and 3 syllable words, get the students into small groups and have them physically show the structure of the syllables (e.g. 1 student hit PET bottle as the stressed syllable. Partner murmur as unstressed syllable.)

4. Have the students to play castanets all the stressed words in the sentence.
Have the students to snap with their fingers all the stressed words in the sentence.




EXCELLENT WORK!

~ Jason

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Re: Tips for Making Lesson Outlines...

Post  Young on Wed Apr 02 2008, 16:05

Thank you for posting classmates' outlines. Each one's outline is different. I expect to learn from others' outlines and correct weak parts of my outline.
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Re: Tips for Making Lesson Outlines...

Post  AmyJun on Wed Apr 02 2008, 16:09

Wow..I got lots of thing from the classmates~ For example, I found out that Gloria's outline is very specific, and Namsook used various tools to attract students such as photos, real dishes and so on. Also, I was very impressed with some methods of noticing from David and Hyun a 's outlines. I realized that we can get a good outline even though a dialogue is long or short and the key is how to handle appropriately. As I say again, I learned a lot of good things and they are very helpful. Thank you all and professor Jason !!
I will very appreciate that you give some advice after I post my lesson 4 outline Smile
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